You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘impact’ category.

I dressed in black for work today. It matched my mood and I felt emotionally the way I did after 9/11. The flags should be lowered as after any national tragedy. The people around me were unnaturally subdued.

I did wear red and black socks, with flames. I put them on as part of my intentional choices in wardrobe: my prayer bracelets, so I’d have Julian of Norwich and Saint Francis’ prayers and my family with me; the flame socks symbolizing the burning rage I felt.

flamesock

I wore a blue pantsuit to work yesterday. When we passed a line of people at a polling place on the Muni, the stranger next to me and I chatted about looking forward to the results and how we’d both already voted. He was a Hispanic man.

After work, I gathered with good friends to watch the returns and celebrate with sparkling wine in Hillary glasses. We had hotel rooms so we could celebrate and not have to drive.

As results came in, I was saddened but not surprised to see Indiana go so heavily for bigotry and hatred. I was still optimistic until about 8:45 Pacific time. Worry won out and I lost my appetite for food and drink, and was very quickly completely sober.

The level of stress in the room was climbing, and Whisky felt it, and always more nervous around men, barked more, and I became more tense. My anger grew at the margins by which Hillary was trailing in key races – margins less than the number of votes given to 3rd party candidates in key states. I wanted to yell at the TV commentators, at something. Every time Whisky barked I was ready to snap and when I snapped at her, that just made me angrier at myself. A vicious cycle.

I was – and still am – horrified that so many people in the US could support a candidate who exemplifies the worst in us: misogyny, bigotry, racism and xenophobia. I grieve for the damage the President-elect has said he’ll do to the climate that the entire world relies on, and what that means to my nephews and their families. If that happens, it won’t be recoverable. I am heartbroken.

The damage done to the lives of those persecuted, scapegoated and demonized may be irreparable. The damage done to the Presidency and our collective reputation and the values espoused in our Constitution pale in comparison.

Finally, we could not continue to watch. I needed to be alone, so Whisky and I went home. Whisky was anxious and somewhat fearful of me, adding to my distress. I tried to sleep, and woke up multiple times, only to remember what was wrong.

I cried. When two women I know asked how to explain to their young girls that we could elect a person who thinks it’s OK to sexually assault women, and who vilifies people who aren’t white, there are no acceptable answers. A man raising twin four-year-olds with his husband, said he’d read the first thing is to tell your children you’ll keep them safe, and then reinforce the values we teach our children. I work with many people who are first and second-generation immigrants. I was emotionally fragile all day – near tears multiple times.

So, I dressed all in black for work today, except for those red flame socks. My rage has no outlet that I will allow myself to express, without sinking to the level of the President-elect, and that I will not do.

I have read what far more eloquent people have written to process the election results. I read and later watched, the leadership and caring exhibited by Hillary Clinton in her remarks today. Once again, she put service to the country above self. Once again, President Obama showed his grace and ability as a leader, exhorting us to support the President-elect.

I’m not there. Right now, I’m not sure I will ever be able to support the Executive branch while the new President-elect is in office. He’s despicable. I’m closer to The Audacity of Hopelessness from Roxane Gay, and No, Let’s Not Congratulate Him from Connie Schultz than to the speeches either Hillary or Barack made. Especially – and maybe always – what Connie wrote.

My rage still burns, but I’m working to be able to channel it productively. I won’t need to wear the flame socks to remember that. I will use the rage to forge an even more steely resolve to work on what must change.

Grieving the horror of nine killed in Charleston by a terrorist.
Grieving for my sister-in-law, who just lost her father.
Needing to find, fight and eradicate racism.
Needing to fight for rational gun laws in the US.
Disgusted that GOP political candidates who are Catholic are disparaging the Pope’s message.
Still looking for a job, after too long.
Horrified by the staggering numbers of refugees around the world.
Heartened by the Pope’s message, which clearly ties social justice teaching to the need to change our ways that are destroying the planet.
Heartened that families of victims are living their faith by forgiving the terrorist.
Heartened to see support shared among a community formed via Twitter, when one is in need.

But still sad, disheartened.

Then, a surprise this morning from someone I only know via Twitter. She is giving us a gift, and it’s linked to a fictional character we both admire. I am reminded of the grit and hard-headed determination in that character, and how I sometimes use her to help me move forward when things are hard. Timely reminder. I have a little flame of optimism lit inside me again.

Thanks, Terry. And thanks, Diana, for creating Claire.

Our actions can have unknown impacts on others, so let’s be positive.
Even small gestures can have a big impact to the person you reach, even if you never know it.

I’m working from home today, and it’s nice to exercise at my own pace, with views of the sunrise and garden, and coffee and stollen mixed in with the stretching routine. Since my new “office” is a busy co-working space, working from home makes a nice change. I can spread out and think in peace, with my dog beside me and have music or the washing machine as background noise if I want it.

My work today made me think about what I need to do and hope to accomplish in the coming year. With the coming of 2014, I am officially making a big shift in my life – one that has been struggling to be born for at least 5 years, and likely longer. As of January 1st, I am officially in my new role with the Mission Hub organization, leading the content team for both Social Capital Markets and our Impact Hubs in San Francisco, Berkeley, Philadelphia and New York City.

My work is to connect dots about ideas and enterprises and people, both to help catalyze positive change and to enable greater impact through those connections. It is also to create programs and events that highlight those changes and impacts and powerful connections, so that others can learn about them and be inspired to join, invest and support, or be inspired to take their own initiatives to the next level.

Part working a global puzzle in space, part doing really basic blocking and tackling, the work is both intellectually and emotionally stimulating and enormously challenging, but I believe it’s the right way for me to contribute to a better world, at least for now. I am working for an expanding startup, with attendant challenges. There are more ideas than I can possibly execute on at present, particularly with a tiny team. Part of my challenge is to drive revenue so that we can grow the team and expand the impact we make. The work is a combination of ideation, working with ideas to craft programs, and execution. Some days, that means a combination of efforts that makes my head spin, as I may need to shift from talking with a thought leader in impact investing or social enterprise, and brainstorming potential content ideas, and move from there to figuring out a pro forma budget for an event.

I am working at a salary that sustains me, albeit at 1/3 what I made 5 years ago. I will continue to live without first world luxuries I’d been used to, some of which I miss dearly, particularly being able to gift travel to my family and pay for a regular cleaning service.

All that said, I am looking forward to an exciting 2014, having officially crossed a bridge in my career trajectory towards values alignment.

Here’s to a 2014 filled with making the world a better place for all!

This post is dedicated to my nephews, and their generation.

Michelle Obama delivered a speech last night that reminded me of why I am so passionate about the issues in this election, and of the values that I got from my parents and grandparents, and hope to pass on to the next generation.

We get there because of folks like my Dad…folks like Barack’s grandmother…men and women who said to themselves, “I may not have a chance to fulfill my dreams, but maybe my children will…maybe my grandchildren will.”

So many of us stand here tonight because of their sacrifice, and longing, and steadfast love…because time and again, they swallowed their fears and doubts and did what was hard.

So today, when the challenges we face start to seem overwhelming – or even impossible – let us never forget that doing the impossible is the history of this nation…it’s who we are as Americans…it’s how this country was built.

And if our parents and grandparents could toil and struggle for us…if they could raise beams of steel to the sky, send a man to the moon, and connect the world with the touch of a button…then surely we can keep on sacrificing and building for our own kids and grandkids.

Mom, who started working while in high school, and put herself through Indiana University while working full time and maintaining scholarship-worthy grades. Her sister, my Aunt Barb, who spent her career working in a bank, and – like President Obama’s grandmother – saw the men she trained be promoted above her. My mom and dad, who were public school teachers, and put in long hours, both in the classroom and outside, but were committed to helping their students learn, as well as raising me and my brother, and ensuring both of us got good college educations.

I care deeply about future generations, and want them to benefit from opportunities as I did. I don’t have children, but I have three nephews, two now in college. Their grandmother and I are helping to pay for their educations, so that they won’t have debt when they graduate, as I did. Mom and I are holding open the door of opportunity that we went through, not letting it slam shut.

I also care about the world we are leaving to the next generation, and their children. How we have damaged – likely irrevocably – the environment, will be left for future generations to deal with the devastation that climate change is bringing to the US and the world. I am passionate about doing my part to bend the arc of history towards the social, economic and environmental justice needed for a sustainable future, so that I can take satisfaction that I’ve done my best for my nephews’ generation, and seven generations beyond. Michelle Obama continued:

And if so many brave men and women could wear our country’s uniform and sacrifice their lives for our most fundamental rights…then surely we can do our part as citizens of this great democracy to exercise those rights…surely, we can get to the polls and make our voices heard on Election Day.
If farmers and blacksmiths could win independence from an empire…if immigrants could leave behind everything they knew for a better life on our shores…if women could be dragged to jail for seeking the vote…if a generation could defeat a depression, and define greatness for all time…if a young preacher could lift us to the mountaintop with his righteous dream…and if proud Americans can be who they are and boldly stand at the altar with who they love…then surely, surely we can give everyone in this country a fair chance at that great American Dream.
Because in the end, more than anything else, that is the story of this country – the story of unwavering hope grounded in unyielding struggle.
That is what has made my story, and Barack’s story, [and Elizabeth’s and Stephen’s, Eric’s, Gavin’s and Garrett’s stories] and so many other American stories possible.

Michelle Obama’s speech served for me as a reminder of what hard work and commitment look like, how they shape us, and why we need to rededicate ourselves to our commitment for justice and future generations. I am rededicated to my work. I hope you are, too.

The SOCAP11 team wants people to solve:

Money + Meaning = the convergence of my values with how I earn, invest and spend my money. It’s about translating my values into action in the marketplace, using the power of the market for good.

To start, I need reliable, easily accessible information, to answer the questions my values lead me to ask.

  • As a consumer: Is the product/service and its intended use sustainable, all along the supply chain and through end of life? Is the company that makes the product or provides the service operating ethically and justly? Can I trust their claims of sustainability?
  • As a worker: Is my employer operating ethically and justly, providing reasonable pay and fair treatment to me and my colleagues, valuing all stakeholders, and making sustainable products?
  • As an investor: Are the public or private companies I invest in producing the sustainable products and services needed, and are they operating as I’d want them to as an employee?

All this requires transparency and useful data that is readily available. The time and effort needed to understand the different ratings systems is frustrating. We lack a consistent way to define what is sustainable, with groups and tools focused on different social and environmental factors. Add in the inequality that currently exists in the world, and the whole problem gives me a headache. I don’t mean to say the situation is hopeless, just that the problem is complex.

I hope SOCAP11 will keep working at transparency and standards, so it becomes easier to achieve the convergence of values with the power of money.

That’s one way to solve the equation. What’s yours?